Unusual Vegetable Plants

Pages.

Introduction
About The Author
Aloe Vera
Angelica
Artemesia
Asparagus
Asparagus Pea
Aubergine
Bay Tree
Caraway
Cardoons
Chicory
Chili Peppers
Celeriac
Chives
Cinamon Vine
Coffee
Courgette
Elephant Garlic
Fennel
Florence Fennel
Garlic
Garlic Chives
Ginger
Globe Artichoke
Hamburg Parsley
Hops
Horseradish
Jerusalem Artichoke
Kale
Kohl Rabi
Lemon Balm
Licorice
Marjoram
Marrows
Mushrooms
Nasturtiums
Oca
Okra
Pak Choi
Pumpkin
Radish Mooli
Salsify
Scorzonera
Sea Kale
Squash
Soya Beans
Stevia
Sweet Peppers
Sweet Corn
Sweet Potatoes
Tea
Tobacco
Tomatillo
Tree Onions
Verbena
Vine Leaves
Wasabi
Water Cress
Welsh Onion
Winter Savory
Yacon
Yams         

 

  Artemesia

There are many varieties of Artmesia grown for their decorative foliage, most of which are hardy and tolerant of dry conditions, some are deciduous and some are not. These bushy plants can be invasive and are often aromatic with a smell that is not always popular and can even repel insects. . 

A common name used for certain varieties of Artmesia is "Wormwood." Wormwood is steeped in history as far back as the ancient Greeks and Egyptians. During the Middle Ages one medicinal use was to exterminate tapeworm in the human body, although it has been used for many things and still is to this day. The essential oil, which gives it its qualities, called "Terpene Thujone" is found in many other herbs including Tarragon and Corriander, is also said to give clarity of thought. In its pure natural form the oil is very poisonous, but is safe after it has been diluted and processed into the alcoholic drink known as "Absinthe" and you would die from alcoholic poisoning long before you could ingest enough poison to harm you

Artemesia Absinthium is the particular variety that is used, along with Anise and Fennel, to make the infamous drink that was banned in many countries in the early 1900's. USA banned the sale of Absinthe in 1912 and France in 1915. The psychological effects and toxicity were blamed for many social problems in France in a very similar way to that of Gin in the U.K. in earlier times. However, modern research has concluded that the psychological effects and  toxicity of the drink were exaggerated and bans have been lifted in recent years for most countries. Oddly enough, Absinthe was never banned in  the U.K. or Spain where production continued. Sales have rocketed since the 1990ís due mainly to imports from the Czech Republic. Although often called a liqueur, Absinthe, does not have extra sugar added and so is really a very strong green spirit.

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